Old maps of Australia

The first ship and team mapped the Australian shoreline were the Duyfken captained by Dutch explorer Willem Janszoon. He sighted the Cape York Peninsula shore in early 1606. William Dampier, an English explorer, landed on the north-west shoreline of New Holland in 1688. In 1770, James Cook cruised along and mapped the east coast, which he called New South Wales, and claimed Great Britain.

With the loss of its American colonies in 1783, the British Government sent a navy of ships under the leadership of Captain Arthur Phillip to found a new penal settlement in New South Wales.

Below is an Atlas of Old Maps of Australia in chronological order.

The first Map of Australia from Nicholas Vallard’s Atlas (1547)

The first Map of Australia from Nicholas Vallard's Atlas (1547)

Map of a not yet fully discovered Australia (1659)

Map of a not yet fully discovered Australia (1659)

French Map of Australia (1753)

French Map of Australia and part of New Zealand (1753)

James Cook’s Map of the East Coast of “New South Wales” (1770)

James Cook's Map of the East Coast of "New South Wales" (1770)

Map of Australia as Ulimaroa (1780)

Map of Australia as Ulimaroa (1780)

Map of Australia (1793)

Map of Australia (1793)

“New Holland and New Guinea” (1798)

New Holland and New Guinea

Map of Australia (1802). One of the first that separated Tasmania from the mainland.

Map of Australia (1802). One of the first that separated Tasmania from the mainland.

Notasia (1806)

Notasia (1806)

Map of Australia, New Guinea and the eastern islands of Indonesia (1815)
Carte de la Nouvelle Hollande

Map of Australia (1815)

New Holland and New Zealand (1842)

New Holland and New Zealand (1842)

Japanese Map of Australia (1862)

Japanese Map of Australia (1862)

Map of Australia by C.F.Weiland (1882)

Map of Australia by C.F.Weiland (1882)

Large Pictorial Map of Australia (1889)

Large Pictorial Map of Australia (1889)

Temperature and vegetation of Australia (1896) [in German]

Temperature and vegetation of Australia and New Zealand

Australia (1911)

Australia (1911)

Map of the native languages of Australia labeled in German (1919)

Map of the native languages ​​of Australia labeled in German

Australia: a gigantic inheritance (1919)
The fifth country in the World rich in mineral, pastoral, agricultural and timber resources.

Australia - a gigantic inheritance (1919)

Principal river basins of Australia (1925)

Principal river basins of Australia (1925)

The discovery and exploration of Australia by sea and land (1927)

Writing in 1555 Calvano stated that Sebastian del Cano on a voyage fro Timor to the Cape of Good Hope in the “Victoria” in the year 1519 discovered islands on the Tropic of Capricorn.

The discovery and exploration of Australia by sea and land (1927)

The population of Australia (1929)

Population of Australia (1929)

Vegetation wall map of Australia (1929)

Vegetation wall map of Australia (1929)

Australia by Sheep and Wheat (1929)

Australia by Sheep and Wheat (1929)

Cattle and minerals (1929)

Cattle and minerals (1929)

Rainfall pressure and winds for January (1929)

Rainfall pressure and winds for January (1929)

The comparative areas of Australia and Europe (1930)

The comparative sizes of Australia and Europe

The Aboriginal Tribes of Australia (1940)

The Aboriginal Tribes of Australia (1940)

Australia her natural and industrial resources (1942)

Australia her natural and industrial resources (1942)

Habitability map of Australia (1946)

Habitability map of Australia from (1946)

Australia pictorial exploration map (1965)

Australia pictorial exploration map

Aboriginal languages of Australia (1966)

The Tindale Map displays 250 various languages and dialects of the Australian Mainland’s Aboriginal Peoples. It took Norman Tindale fifty years to compile and challenged the idea that Australia was Terra Nullius before the White settlement.

Map of Aboriginal languages of Australia

The indigenous population failed for 150 years following settlement, primarily due to contagious diseases.

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