The U.S. States By Electoral Votes

The Electoral College is the group of presidential electors needed by the U.S. Constitution to form every 4 years for the single goal of electing the 2 highest leadership positions in the U.S. – the president and vice president.

The electors’ group comprises 538 members, which means a candidate needs at least 270 votes to win.

These members are sourced from every of the fifty U.S. states, and the amount of electors from a state is defined by the number of members it has in both the House of Representatives and Senate. Nowadays, the 2 houses have 535 members, with 435 coming from the House of Representatives and 100 from the Senate. The extra 3 come from D.C., as specified by the 23 Amendment.

Map of Electoral Votes

California has the most electoral seats (55) of any U.S. state, while Texas places 2nd with 38 seats. New York and Florida each have 29 seats, while Pennsylvania and Illinois have 20 seats per state. Seven U.S. states (Alaska, Delaware, Montana, Vermont, Wyoming, North, and South Dakota) and D.C. have the least number of seats.

As a result, to win an election, candidates must appeal to a large and various set of states rather than concentrating only on the several U.S. cities with the most significant population densities.

The downside of this system is that residents living in the 8 least populous states, with 4.5 percent of the Electoral College, have more voting influence than people in the more populated U.S. states with 95.5 percent.

For example, in 2020, a state is awarded one electoral vote for every 615,242 people on average. However, Wyoming has 3 electoral votes and only 575,760 citizens (as of 2020 estimates). As a result, each of Wyoming’s 3 electoral votes corresponds to 191,920 people, and Wyomingites have 3 times as much clout in the Electoral College as an average American.

The map below shows contribution of each popular vote to electoral vote outcome, in number of persons, by U.S state

Contribution of each popular vote to electoral vote outcome, in number of persons, by U.S state

This electoral map of the U.S. below depicting the hypothetical scenario in which a candidate narrowly wins the election, notwithstanding having 126 million more popular votes.

Map of the theoretical scenario of the election
Reddit user: Powatanner
The U.S. States by Electoral Votes
RankStateElectoral Votes
1California55
2Texas38
3Florida29
4New York29
5Illinois20
6Pennsylvania20
7Ohio18
8Georgia16
9Michigan16
10North Carolina15
11New Jersey14
12Virginia13
13Arizona11
14Tennessee11
15Indiana11
16Massachusetts11
17Washington10
18Minnesota10
19Missouri10
20Wisconsin10
21Maryland10
22Colorado9
23Alabama9
24South Carolina9
25Kentucky8
26Oregon7
27Oklahoma7
28Connecticut7
29Nevada6
30Utah6
31Kansas6
32Iowa6
33Arkansas6
34Louisiana6
35Mississippi6
36New Mexico5
37Nebraska5
38West Virginia5
39Idaho4
40Rhode Island4
41New Hampshire4
42Maine4
43Hawaii4
44Montana3
45Wyoming3
46South Dakota3
47North Dakota3
48Washington D.C.3
49Delaware3
50Vermont3
51Alaska3

Related posts:
The Clinton Archipelago and Trump’s America
2020 U.S. Election Mapped: What happened to TrumpLand?
What if “Did Not Vote” were a candidate in the 2020 U.S. Presidential Election?
The U.S. Presidential Voting History Mapped

1 Star2 Stars (No Ratings Yet)
Loading...